Alberta

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Table for looking up the composition of Canada, 1867-1999. © 2018. Past Presence. All rights reserved.

This is a page of resources for the province of Alberta, Canada.

1906 Census

For Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba only, three special censuses were taken to measure the impact of settlement and migration. As a result, there are 3 extra census records for genealogists: the 1906, 1916, and the soon-to-be-released 1926.

1916 Census (Prairie Provinces)

Begun on 01 Jun 1916, the second Prairie-only census was taken. It was the 9th for Manitoba, and the 3rd for both Saskatchewan and Alberta.

Alberta Government Telephone Books – Medicine Hat and District Genealogical Society

There’s nothing like a good set of city directories. Here’s Alberta’s, courtesy of the Medicine Hat and District Genealogical Society.

Alberta Online historical newspapers summary – The Ancestor Hunt

If you’re looking for a different way of looking for newspapers, this site offers links by geographic location. You’ll need to know the name of your town, but if you do, you may find periodicals you didn’t know existed.

Cypress Hills Massacre – Canadian Encyclopedia

Everyone approaches genealogy differently, and for different reasons. For me, genealogy helps me see historical events with a new perspective – through the eyes of our ancestors. Here’s a good summary of the Cypress Hills Massacre of SK and AB, 1873.

Edmonton Cemeteries 

Think your ancestor might have been buried in Edmonton, Alberta? Check here.

LSD Finder

If you’re not a farmer, you probably have a little trouble reading the legal land descriptions for the Prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. This is my goto lookup – and it’s free for the first 20 searches / day.

Newspapers from Peel’s Prairie Provinces (University of Alberta)

When I was at the SK genealogical conference in April, 2018, I attended a lecture about using digitized newspapers for genealogical research.

Here’s an excellent resource for the province of Alberta, which has 106 newspapers in this collection, and most focus on Alberta as of this writing (Apr 2018).

Hint

Use the location finder at the top for “Town/City” to narrow the results. For example, if you choose “Calgary,” your results will be The Alberta Non-Partisan, The Calgary Eye-Opener, The Calgary Weekly Herald, The Eye Opener, and The Rebel.

Non-BC Wills, Abbotsford Genealogical Society

This is an odd one, and a total Hail Mary shot in the dark, but there is a slim chance your ancestor left a will in …BC. I found 200+ entries for wills for Alberta residents in this index, which is a list compiled by the AGS. There are also wills for SK, Manitoba, England, Scotland, etc.

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Provincial Archives of AB. © Past Presence. All rights reserved.

Provincial Archives of Alberta – Birth, Marriage and Death Records

Alberta! Always the province to go its own way, and its vital stats are no different. You can even download them, if your family originates in Alberta. After a couple of weeks looking for a few elusive ancestors, my advice is read the How To Guide first, then read them all. At least the handwriting is easy to read.

I had the opportunity to visit the Provincial Archives of Alberta (PAA) in Edmonton in person. It is a genealogist’s dream: huge space, tons of resources, friendly and knowledgeable archivists, free parking, free access, free lockers, open Saturdays, and super cheap document printing. Unlike some other collections, the PAA will not allow researchers to bring cameras or phones into the reading room, but at 35 cents/page it’s very affordable. Check the hours before you go: the PAA is not open Sundays or Mondays.

HINT: From Shannon’s Research Services comes this fabulous guide to Vital Statistics Alberta for getting the most out of the indices.

Wills, Probate, Land, Tax & Criminal (Ancestry)

Just when you think you’re familiar with it, Ancestry coughs up another collection. I don’t fully understand why a general search doesn’t (always) bring up these interesting nuggets, but where would be the fun in that? Here’s the interesting part: I took a spin through the prairie homestead records found here, and they are different from the ones held at the provincial archives.